Autumn

Autumn

Friday, September 6, 2013

My Morning

The Para P-12 sits disassembled on my desk. I've just given its bore a good scrub, oiled its parts and reached to replace the recoil spring and plug back into place when I slipped and released the spring. It flew across the room.

Out comes my flashlight. I find the recoil spring, no problem. Reach and place it back on my desk...spring plug, no where to be found. I search, and search. Paper bags are upturned and emptied. I move various junk and shine the Surefire into crevices that haven't seen light in decades. I even tapped my shirt pockets just to make sure the plug didn't recoil and slap me in the chest.

About two hours later I'm about ready to sling the handgun against the wall. Took a sip of coffee. Told myself to relax. Picked up the frame and out drops the recoil spring plug. Sigh.

Five minutes later she's reassembled and ready for action.

Thus as been my morning.

Think I'll take a walk.

Stephen

34 comments:

  1. You always find it in the last place you look.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the truth...thanks, my friend.

      Delete
  2. You just described virtually every gun strip down I've ever done. Minus every possible variation of the F-Word, of course :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trust me, Bubba...I said a few choice words too. Thanks, my friend.

      Delete
  3. Glad you were able to find it Stephen! Sounds like things when Angry Mike is doing the same... Have a great weekend :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, my friend and you have a great weekend too.

      Delete
  4. Glad you found the plug - reminds me of the first time I stripped my 1911... 'nuff said.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first time I stripped a 1911, on my own, I left it in parts for weeks....thanks, Bubba.

      Delete
  5. Glad you didn't catch it in the eye. Bits and pieces are often the cause of a great amount of frustration when you disassemble firearms. Springs are the worst.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed. I remember reading of a spring box for revolver repair....somewhere. Have a good evening, my friend.

      Delete
  6. I thought it was going to be in your coffee! I learned to avoid flying springs by the simple trick of placing an open plastic binder in front of my handgun. It's a great shield against flying springs landing elsewhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hum, not a bad idea. Thanks, Sweet Joy.

      Delete
  7. On the bright side at least it wasn't an Mahduece :)

    Seen that happen once in AIT when some idiot didn't put the safety plate on right. It was an eye opener.

    ReplyDelete
  8. dear, dear sweet one - for the love of all that is holy i am coming down there and cleaning and organizing that office. that is all.

    your friend,
    kymber

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, it isn't even Spring...give me time. Now, run help Jamie...

      Delete
  9. Stephen, next time, try placing the fire arm in a BIG zip lock bag. Stick your hands in and, if, the spring and plug go, they should stay in the bag.

    Just a thought. I use to do the bag thing, when I would disassemble my Ruger Mark II.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I was thinking that you would find it at the bottom of your coffee cup.

    I've got forced hot air floor vents that attract small parts. They will break the laws of physics to suck up tiny screws and do hickeys.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least you know where to look for those little bittie suckers...this office is fill with hidden places, and parts, yet discovered. Thanks, my friend.

      Delete
  11. If you have to pack a gun when going out for a walk to feel safe then it is time to move somewhere else...

    Sarge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kinda threw me there, Sarge. I took the walk to relax....and, I don't attend the head without a gun. Thanks.

      Delete
  12. At least it wasn't an AR detent spring that flew out, those are a serious pain in the buttocks to find.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true...I've lost at least a hundred. Thanks, Bubba.

      Delete
  13. Stephen,

    It sounds like you need several cups of coffee before even starting this project :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy, it's a fairly easy operation I've preformed hundreds of times over the years on various firearms...and I'd had about six cups of coffee before this one...come to think of it that might have been my problem. Thanks, Sweet Lady.

      Delete
  14. Always happens doesn't it. rolls eye...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It happens....sometimes. Thanks, Rob.

      Delete
  15. Boss, that's a sweet looking piece, is that the one someone pawned sometime back?

    I offer this respectfully, to Sarge (I took your comment literally), but one can never know when he/she might might need their piece. You HAVE to assume it could happen anytime. I'm certain that Doctor's family up in CT (several years back) that got invaded, beaten, raped, and finally set on fire.... I'm sure they lived in one of the better areas in town. And at the risk of being repetitious, that wasn't out on the street. It was in their house.

    I came very darn close to pulling mine a couple years ago on a group of Mexicans in the mall parking lot. Stephen actually had to pull his a few days ago. Sarge, it won't do you any good if you don't have it on you.

    Stephen, sorry for the long comment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, Matt it is and it was too sweet not to take home. I find I carry it more than any other of those I own. It shoots like a dream.
      I and my friend and another nice gentleman did have a few tense moments last week. Thank the good Lord the man 'saw the light' and walked. If he had not it would have ruined our week and probably our lives for quite a spell.

      Thanks for the nice comment.

      Delete
  16. At least you FOUND all the parts... sigh...

    ReplyDelete
  17. I hope you'll forgive me but this made me chuckle. For some reason it called to mind a day in basic training when we were being tested on the timed takedown and reassembly of an M16. Fortunately it wasn't me but there I stood, both hands full, when the guy next to me at the table launched his recoil spring into the air. It hit the concrete and rolled straight to a drain grate and into the drain.

    Not all that difficult to retrieve but it wasn't happening in the allotted time. The look on his face was priceless and, in retrospect later that evening, comical.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nothing to forgive, Knucklehead....I'm sure I had a priceless look on my face too. Later, it was rage. Thanks for the nice comment. Nice to again 'see' you. Take care.

      Delete