Autumn

Autumn

Friday, June 10, 2011

A Beginning Ramble

I guessed her age at about nine, maybe ten, khaki pants with a white shirt, short hair slightly windblown. The bus had just pulled away.

My shop is located on a very busy street across from a large city park. Her school bus stops on the corner.

My last customer had just walked out the door when I saw her walk to the corner and slump against the chain link fence.



Thirty minutes later she was still there. I know why it bugged me. She isn't much older than my granddaughter, and my little one is my heart.

So, I stood guard, walked outside. I conceal carry. She was safe.

Every few minutes she would stand and walk to the edge of the street and glance first one way then the other. Hoping, waiting. She, at least to me, appeared worried.

I have a bench in front of my shop. I tried to appear like an older man just taking a nap, when all I really wanted to do was walk over and give her a hug and tell her it was fine and I was sure mom or dad would be there soon,  but you and I both know I couldn't do that.

Forty two minutes later she was crying when the dusty gray car turned in and she climbed in the back.

At least for a while she had been under my personal protection.

Some parents are just assholes.

(Note: re-posted as requested)

Stephen

33 comments:

  1. That little girl will never know that she was safe that day because you were watching over her. If her parents knew, they would likely be too ignorant to be grateful. But you did the right thing and because you did it anonymously, it is even noble. I'm glad to know there are still people in this world who will step up for the innocent.

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  2. Thank you for the kind words.

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  3. Guardian Angel for a day, nice work. I'd hit the Follow button to make you dance but I don't see at the top of the page. LOL. Grammar schmammer, write it like you think it. Look forward to your posts.

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  4. OJD,thanks. Acted on instinct. Can't help myself when it comes to a child in pain or trouble. I enjoy your writing.

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  5. They are. You did right to keep an eye on her. Glad to see you blogging, I always thought you'd be darned good at it.

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  6. My sincere thanks, Arsenius. Coming from you it means the world to me.

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  7. Well I know that the area in question sure as hell is not the best place for a young girl to be waiting. Only if she knew you were watching out for her, would she have thanked you? It's nice to know that you do that for a stranger, so I know that you will have my six as well and likewise.

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  8. Thanks,Joe. And you know I will always cover your six.

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  9. Makes me happy to know maybe our kids are still safe riding their bikes because decent folk like you keep your eye out. I hate that my 9 year old has such a small play zone because of how dangerous things are. She has to be within shouting distance. Makes me sad. You rock!

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  10. I've had to do the same sort of thing in the past. Sometimes its watching out for a young one, girl or boy, riding on the bus not paying attention to the fact that somebody else is staring at them the way a hungry lion stares at a zebra, because they are entranced by their music on their iPod. Sometimes its in cyberspace allowing naive young kids to sit and hang out with you, running off the ones that are making them more than a bit nervous. Sometimes its just paying the slight bit extra that somebody is lacking to pay for something, like a bus fare to get home to mom and dad. Nobody knows most times. Nobody sees you do it. Well, the only person who counts does, and He will reward you for it.

    There are too few people who are willing to care anymore, and growing fewer. I tip my hat to you before I disappear back into the night. Thank you

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  11. Lila, thank you very much. Enjoy your blog, btw.

    Anon, you do understand. As I've said before, having grandchildren changes the way one looks at the world. They are gifts from God and I for one shall never take children for granted. Thank you.

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  12. 40 years ago my sister-inlaw backpacked through the middle east during summer vacation from college. She described getting off the train in Istambul and, as she walked to the hostel, realizunbg that she was being "followed" by a man, and every so often that man would stop following her, replaced by another man. She was scared. When she told the hostelkeeper what had happened, the hostelkeeper replied that the local men, seeing an unaccompanied young woman walking alone, took it upon themselves to follow her to make sure she was safe. People are the same everywhere and you can't judge them by nationality, language or religion; only their actions.

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  13. Get ready for some visitors. Patrice at Rural Revolution linked to this post. The world takes notice when small miracles are performed unselfishly.

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  14. Hey man. Consider yourself my brother.

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  15. Anon 2, your sister-in-law was a lucky young lady. Thank you so much for the comment.

    OJD, it's humbling. Truly humbling. I wrote this piece intending to paint a picture of uncaring or thoughtless parents. What I did I did for that little girl. Her fear was palpable. Patrice is a sweetheart for posting this little bit of bather. I now wish I had taken the time to edit it.

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  16. Husband of the boss, I am honored. And, the same to you. Give your sweet wife a kiss for me.

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  17. You did a good thing. Thank you.

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  18. I do hope those parents were late because of something they could not control.

    My children also hardly go anywhere without myself or my husband with them. Not necessarily a bad thing, IMO. Most people don't understand or don't care that our world is just not safe anymore.....

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  19. Thank you, Violet.

    Laura, I hope so too. But forty-five minutes is a bit long for a little girl to wait.

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  20. 2 things:

    1) I spent a summer hiking the first 1014.5 miles of the Appalachian Trail. I never spent the night alone in a shelter. There were always a fellow hiker, who started off as a stranger in the evening and in the morning, as we parted ways, a friend. I was grateful that even the fattest of guardian angels could have kept up with my slow hiking.

    2)I'll bet at some point in your life there was an old man that watched you as you played to make sure you were safe. Life comes full circle.

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  21. Mudbug, that was an amazing hike. Would kill me today.

    I'm sure there was an older man watching over me too. The Good Lord and my father and many uncles. I owe them much.
    Thanks.

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  22. God Bless you!
    First saw this at Patrice's blog, I'll be sure and come back!

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  23. Anon, thank you and welcome.

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  24. There are special places in Heaven for people like you.

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  25. Anon, thank you. I'm at a loss for words. Today has been quite shocking for me. God bless.

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  26. Patrice sent me.....LOL

    I'm not a writer, I'm better at reading, but here goes:

    First of all, Thank You.....for genuinely caring for another human being, even if done "on the sly" ~ which brings me to the part of this I find the most heartbreaking: and that is that your good hearted intentions actually helped that girl and yet you had to be cautious how you handled it. BECAUSE the world now a days is quicker to pin the label pedophile on what is really a Good Samaritan, and the real Good Samaritans just aren't appreciated like they deserve to be.

    I find that a sadder situation than parents who are assholes. A sadder commentary on the state of the society surrounding us now a days. I've been around long enough to be a grandparent, even though I'm not officially one yet. I remember how it use to be, nearly a half dozen decades ago. I really miss the trust, the freedom, the security of those times. When the good hearted, well intentioned people outnumbered the opposite, and when people such as yourself were respected.

    Sorry for the mini rant, especially since I am a stranger "barging in here." But I just had to say Thank You to you......And thank you for your courage to figure out a way to still be good hearted with protective intentions and still keep yourself safe, as well.....

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  27. Naturegirl, thank you for your kind comments. Seems to me you're a better writer than you think. Please come back and visit soon.

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  28. Stephen,
    My 2 little sisters (I'm 51 y'so.) my Mom, wife and five nieces thank the good Lord above for Gentlemen like you. Thanks for keeping watch...
    Nowayoutbutup

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  29. Nowayoutbutup, Thank you very much.

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  30. I'm glad you were there for the little girl. To me-she has no parents, leaving her alone for that length of time. They are lucky to have her, and even luckier that you watched her that morning! You have a very kind heart even if you like the guns!

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  31. adlomstk, Thank you for your kind comment. It's nice to know it's possible for me to have a kind heart even if I like 'the guns.' Isn't it possible my love of firearms, and lifelong interest in the gun culture a direct correlation to that little girl's safety...

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  32. Your Mamma raised you right, I'm sure you & others would be watching over my grandaughters. Thank you for caring. A month ago I was on the way home getting off early (02:30)am. I saw a car with the flashers & the cab light on. It was 22 degrees outside. I stopped & asked her what was going on, she ran out of gas, she said she had money but no container. I went home got some gas, put it in her car & sent her on her way. She also had two small children with her. She had gotten off of work & got her kids from the babysitter. What comes around goes around. God is watching us, sometimes we forget. BK

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  33. BK, thank you very much for your kind comment. I'd be honored to watch over your grandchildren. God bless.

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