Autumn

Autumn

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Idle Fingers

Recently I became the new owner of a stash of older Crown Royal bags, sans cords. The old fella said he didn't want the bags, six or seven of 'em and I was welcome to take the warm and fuzzy sacks home. Okay, I said, and thanked him.

I've owned a few over the years. The bags are very handy for precious metals, ammo, small radios and as I've recently discovered, a fine storage container for my binoculars. So, last night I took the blue bags and a roll of 550 cord and sat back with shears and made pull cords. Tedious work. I enjoyed the experience. Just wish I'd taken pictures.

Anyway, nice work for idle fingers, so much so I dug out three very old sets of BDU woodland camo trousers. Very old trousers...willing to bet their older than a few of my readers. One or two pair had lost buttons, or torn knees, rips here and there. I dug out needle and thread and an old block of bee's wax and pretty soon the thimble clicked. Soothing work.

Wish I could find my old military issued sewing kit. Remember? A small folded piece of green canvas with flaps, basic stuff. A needle or two with bits of olive green thread...mine is lost to time.

Any man that lacks the skill to repair his clothing isn't worth his weight in salt.


 Gotta run. Accounts await my attention.

Hey, be careful out there.

Stephen


30 comments:

  1. The last thing my mom did before I left for boot camp was teach me how to sew on a button, and hem a pair of pants. I took it from there, and have to agree: everyone should know how to do basic clothing repair. It's entirely likely we made need to make things last a lot longer, in the days ahead.

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    1. My mother did much the same and I agree....thanks, my friend. I hope all is well with you.

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  2. Saw those kits on doughboymilitarydotc. 25 bucks I think. I sure miss the old surplus stores when I was a kid when all my camping equipment was ww2 gear. I still have my map case, but the plastic grid disappeared. I used it for our ipad for a while. I couldn't stand the operating system so I gave it away. Kept the map case though.
    PS: Many thanks for joining my blog!

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    1. I too miss the old Army/Navy stores...all that wonderful surplus. I even miss the smell..canvas and leather mixed with cordite and cosmoline. I still own an old canvas map case...it hides somewhere among my junk. And, you're welcome. Same to you.

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  3. Needle threaders - even need 'em for the so called "easy" thread ones.
    Have them all around the house so I can usually fine one! (I'm spoiled, though - my thimbles are all sterling)

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    1. I used a needle threader too. My reading glasses are a joke.

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  4. Deutsche Optik sells an Italian kit for $11. I also saw several kits on Amazon.

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    1. Guess what I just ordered...thanks, Bro.

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  5. If you need more of those bags, I'll help you empty the bottles. Just saying . . .

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    1. Truth....I've never, in my life, had a taste of Crown Royal. Then again I don't drink. Maybe it's time. Thanks, my good friend.

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  6. Yep, those bags work for a myriad of things... And I still have my Navy plastic sewing kit (somewhere)...

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    1. My issued kit was canvas...lost it years ago.

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  7. I believe I saw my old army sewing kit not too long ago around here. I bet the wife threw it into her sewing stuff.

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    1. She keeps our sewing stuff in a large prissy flowery box. I always look both ways when I dig among its contents.

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  8. I've got my Dads old Air Force sewing kit around here. I just need to find it again.

    and, I'm with Sixbears. I'll even supply my own drinkin glass.

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    1. Bubba, if I had a full bottle I tip you and Sixbears a huge slug...and join you. I'd probably turn red, but I'd drink.

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  9. Hey sewing is a good skill to learn, I did most of my uniform items while on active duty. It also helps you if you have to sew yourself up. Just saying.

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    1. Very true...so did I. If I try I might be able whip out a running loop with silk like a...well, beginner. I'll leave the wounds to Pirate Jim.

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    2. Yeah, I think that Pirate Jim will do a better job than me, especially if I have a liquid pain killer. I dont want to sew something that I will regret later.

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  10. SW made a quilt for our SIL out of those bags. Cool stuff.

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    1. I found one of the quilts you mentioned on Ebay...neat. Bet it requires a lot of bags.

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  11. My MAMA taught me to sew when I was just a boy. She said "I hope you find a really good wife when you are older, but just in case you end up with one of those sorry no account ones I want you to be able to take care of yourself". She taught me to sew, iron, wash clothes and cook.

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    1. So did mine...my father taught me all about gun powder and lead, fish guts and coon traps. Thanks, Bro.

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    2. My daughter refused to learn to sew. Luckily, she married a man who hemmed all her pants since she is short.

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  12. " . . a large prissy flowery bag . . "
    You, dear Stephen - are a hoot.
    And quite a handy fella.

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  13. That was a nice acquisition. The bags will come in handy.

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  14. I transfer my revolver in and out of the motel room in a Crown bag. People don't bat an eye, but I'm betting they'd be upset if it was in a holster.

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  15. "Any man that lacks the skill to repair his clothing isn't worth his weight in salt."

    Dang straight. We invented the lightbulb, the suspension bridge and the internal combustion engine. It's only out of the kindness of our hearts that we allow the wimminfolk to sew our buttons back on.

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  16. I know there are many of your followers who want to put an arm around your shoulders and hope we'll be hearing from you when life gets smoother and your muse is singing again.

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  17. I was 14 or so when my mother entered college. I quickly learned to use a needle and thread and soon the sewing machine. My cooking skills improved every day and got on the job management training while tending my younger brother and sister, house keeping and a myriad of other household skills. That was my college education.

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