Autumn

Autumn

Sunday, February 9, 2014

Afternoon Delight

The truck is clean and shines. The engine oil has been refreshed with an addition of a bottle of Marvel's Mystery Oil - even dumped a bit into the gasoline. (Its that red bottle at the auto shop.) The truck tires are stuffed full of new air and I even cleaned the friggin leaves out of my windscreen vents.

The driveway is leaf free too. I swear six tons of leaves have fallen since last week. I, of course, was careful not to allow any to escape into my neighbors yard....she's so prissy about leaves from her oak, which the winds dump onto my driveway, finding their way back into her yard. Last time we had words I told her I was certain she wanted to mulch them and only wanted to help. So instead I was careful to blow the pile deep into her shrubs. She'll never know the difference.

Earlier as I hosed clean an area of our brick walk I passed by one of my old clay pots where once a beautiful healthy basil grew. I glanced around at all the other now empty pots and felt like old cat poop at a dog show. I believe it's time for me to rebuild my herb garden....such as it was, all in pots.

I haven't a single solitary pepper plant. They've all died. I place all the blame on my six day work schedule and this friggin depression. Anyhow, it's time for change.

So, next weekend, on my day off, I shall make time and visit a local plant nursery. (They, the lovers of northern climate change, giggle. Nursery? Well yes. One of such is located but a few minutes from my front door and guess what, its open.) There I shall pick through their sorry stock and find something, some herb, to plant.

I have an itch to grow food.

It's been a short weekend.

Stephen

16 comments:

  1. I get the planting urge every spring too. Then when its 110 in the shade and the plants are looking sorry, I wonder why I do this every year. Well the tomatoes are good every year. You just have to get the kind that do well in your weather.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You just described August. When the awful month arrives I hibernate in the air conditioning.

      Delete
  2. You know that the leaves of our area haven't even started falling yet. For us, that it a Springtime event. One that shocks the rest of the fall growing regions in our fair country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haven't you heard, Deb....it is Spring, here.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. It's funny or weird, depending on a persons view of me, but it seems to help my truck run smoother.

      Delete
  4. What season are you in?? Our leaves have been gone for months .. replaced with icicles and frosty snow. There is not one pot of green in yard or nursery shop. We're all asleep .. with dirty mucky cars .. covered in road salt and sand. Think I'll go back to sleep and let you bask in your reality.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My dear sweet friend, here in North Florida we have two leaf falls, one in late autumn, which is slight, and the other which begins in late winter to early spring depending on rain and warmth. A simple false spring can trigger the leaves of Water and Live oaks to drop. It's a mess. Within a period of one week my yard and drive were covered.

      Delete
  5. I've been thinking about trying a garden again this spring. If we have a spring, which I am beginning to doubt. I've never had any luck, all I seem to be able to grow is Indian corn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It all comes down to the enrichment of the soil and plant selection. You are a wise and brilliant man. Read. Hey, try (cough) Mother Earth News and others of its ilk. Due to my in-ground irrigation system I would need to build raised beds so instead I use various sized clay pots. I mix my soil with compost, lime, and peat. Fertilize to fit the plant. If I can grow plants so can you....thanks, my friend.

      Delete
  6. Stephen,

    I bet you ended up washing that truck yourself........ :P :P

    If your interested in possibly starting a garden it's a great way to relieve stress from work :-)

    And really good way to get rid of all those leaves, start a compost pile in your yard. You can use your compost in your garden later on. Just a thought!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandy, truth is I had the truck half finished when she drove into the driveway. Ten minutes later she came out and offered help and pitched in and we finished it together. Me, all smiles.
      I was raised on and around farms. I've had gardens most of my life, matter of fact, I specialized in heirloom variates. Then, came Obama and this depression...long hours, lack of interest. Garden, DRT.
      I own a huge compost barrel which you load with brown and green vegetables and yard waste and rotate (turn) several times a week. It'll turn out wheelbarrow loads monthly if tended properly. In the old days I used to just pile and pitchfork my compost. Thanks, Sweet Lady.

      Delete
  7. Upstairs, I've got six basil seedlings poking little green leaves baerly above the soil, stretching with all their 1/4 inch might for the weak winter sunlight coming in the window. Here's hoping at least one makes it of mine, and your pots will provide full hale and hearty herbs for you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do love me so of 'dat 'dare Basil. Usually one or two plants are all I can use in a given season. Basil hates our super hot late July thru September weather. Makes me want to whip out a Bruschetta thinking about it. Thanks, My Lovely Friend.

      Delete
  8. " . . . this friggin depression."
    Hang in there, Stephen. You're not alone . . .
    Wishing you a peaceful heart.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Cathy....I often feel alone.

      Delete